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Posts tagged “Lighthouse

Rockland Light

_DSC3511 copyThis is the lighthouse on the hill at the mouth of the harbor. It is not in Rockland where there is a rock jetty everyone walks. This lighthouse is a dedicated car ride to find. I happened to appear on the lighthouse tour day. So I got a shot of the Fresnel lens that can be had once a year._DSC3527 copy


Marshall Point Light

_DSC3415 copyI first was introduced to this light through the kindness of Bobby Draper. He knew I photographed lighthouses. On our way past he stopped for me to get a photo op. This was taken many trips later. But I remember who showed it to me first. Thanks Bob.


Lighthouse Special

_DSC3270 copyOne day a year the lighthouse is open to the public. I just happened to be there on that day. It was completely random for me. I took the tour inside later. And there in the reflection was someone in the lighthouse. You can’t get this shot again till next year. Maybe?


Close Up Please

_DSC5610I have a shot this Portland lighthouse from all directions and many angles. What is left? Take a close up. Get the light. Let it be dusk and let the soft blur of sunset suffuse the scene. Hey it works for me.


Portland Light

_DSC5509This is an easy lighthouse to find and to see. Walk around. Change perspective. Get the clouds. Get the foreground. Everyone rushes up to the fence and has eyes only for the lighthouse. Yes there are not too many opportunities like this. And you can get around it from many angles and viewpoints. _DSC5510I standby and watch groups, families and individuals all shoot. Look down! The best shot is in the tidal pool at their feet. It is not always a shot. Sometimes there is a breeze to blur the reflection. Only a few are able to see this shot and get it._DSC5514


Potland Bug Light

_DSC1332 copyI’m spinning my archive. The good thing about living in Maine for a while is that you got to visit lighthouses in inclement weather. Fog is always a hard subject. The other element is the light itself. Then to blend soft light and focused detail is harder yet. I let the camera figure out the exposure. I just fixed the compositional elements. In that instant I got the shot I wanted. It’s good.


Local Lighthouse, Portland

_DSC1034There is a distinct advantage to having a local lighthouse to visit. While I was in Maine I took advantage of the less than sunny days to visit the Portland lighthouse. Fog, snow, and rain became part of the inventory of interesting images. I always saw tourists in a hurry, drive up, photograph the lighthouse, hop in the car, and drive away again. I never even had the chance to point out the best show was at their feet in the reflections of the tidal pools on the rocks below. On the days when the reflection was sharp because the wind was still, you got that signature shot everyone looks to get.

_DSC1019I’m not one to camp out and wait for sunset, or to wait hours upon hours for the clouds to arrange themselves for my image. And I’m not a fan of changing things in Photoshop. I prefer drive by shooting. Hey, it works for me. I can appreciate some images that were made by others who toiled and waited…. just not me.

_DSC1021If you just look down at the tidal pools, there’s a reflection to reward you. On a sunny day a polarizing filter will get you a more distinct image. Either way try to break out of the typical tourist mode and get something different.


Maine Fog

1817 28 Maine lighthouse fog copy

Sometimes you never know how things will come out. I was pleasantly surprised to get the lighthouse detail of this shot in the early morning fog. We were in Lubec, Maine and I’m shooting to the Canadian side lighthouse. It has that little red crest that they like in Canada. The shot is too centered. My bad, I’m still an amateur at that time. It’s film not digital, so there’s no way to know whether the shot is good until much later. I look at the old shots and am pretty amazed to have such nice slides. I really trusted to luck back then. There was some skill, I suppose. To me it was like conducting a photo experiment. The results would come back months later. You needed a lot of patience. In those days I was already developing my own slides. So I would shoot enough to make it worthwhile to mix up a batch of solution – usually about 60 rolls. That could take about half a year. As I said I was patient… and careful. You have to hold the water temperature to 100 degrees plus or minus a tenth of a degree. Yes, I did it… nerve wracking but I did it.


Orient Point

 

We are at the eastern most point on the north fork of Long Island. It’s the terminus for the ferry. This ferry has had a significant part in our lives. It connects Long Island to New London, Connecticut. It is the way to summer camp, friends, skiing, Maine and so many events. It’s not a regular trip but we’ve made it often enough for the scene to be familiar. Like everything else, I take a picture of the lighthouse on each trip. Sometimes you like the shot better than others.


Jump

Under the George Washington Bridge. On my last day in New York, the kids and I rode our bikes to the GW Bridge. It was my last outdoor bike ride for now. As part of our ongoing silliness project, the kids ‘jumped’ in front of the Little Red Lighthouse. It took a few tries to get this one. I had a Canon G11 with the usual fractional timed shutter delay. You’d be surprised but a jump doesn’t last but a moment and to get both kids in the air was more challenging than I expected. Anyway, I got the shot. Since then I have gone to the other side of the globe and Julia will land in Africa in a couple hours. This is a memorable moment on many planes.


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