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Posts tagged “Red Sea

Spotted Eel

IMG_9841I have been told there are no sea snakes here. It makes sense. Snakes breath air. This was a spotted eel. He was going along the bottom when we found him. I was stuck. I had just caught another puffer in my left hand. I had my camera in the right. That left me with no way to adjust the camera. And I needed another hand for the flashlight. Yes I could have used help from the octopus. This is a very rare find. The kids saw one in December but we only got a small part of the body – no head shot.


Octopus

IMG_9749On a night dive it is special to see an octopus. I guess it is the season right now. I was fortunate to see them quite frequently in the flurry of recent dives. We caught this guy in the open! That is unusual. He was unsure whether to run or hide. So we split the difference. I was able to get the shots. I have been in the Red Sea for a while. And to see an octopus is not usual. For some reason all my dive buddies were seeing them and sharing their observations. Sometimes you just hit it right.IMG_9750


Swarming On The Reef

IMG_9463This school of fish was migrating over the reef in huge numbers. The light just didn’t let me get good detail. They were colorful. The fish seemed to be migrating. I kept looking around. There were probably big fish looking for a tasty fish dinner too. And I was not interested in meeting any large predators.

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Nudibranch

IMG_9351Another rule in the sea: anything brightly colored should be avoided. From my reading these creatures store poison in vesicles, which it releases when threatened. So the bright markings are a warning. The shot you need is to see the horns and the tuft. These two guys were not too far from one another. I lifted a prayer rug and there they were. Prayer rug? Yes somebody discarded a rug into the sea. And the one on the white coral is striking in contrast. The actual size is about that of your little finger nail.IMG_9354


One Man’s Trash

IMG_9308It’s a jellyfish. I have never seen one like this. And I have never seen one here on the reef till now. I was following my dive buddy and he swam over it. He said he’s seen them and thought nothing of it. Well I saw it move unnaturally to the current. So I poked it. Sorry. And it moved. So it was alive. Now I lifted it? And I could see the sucker pulsating. It didn’t have tentacles and it wasn’t translucent. But otherwise it behaved like a jellyfish. So I got my first shot of a jellyfish. Looking at it on the sandy sea bottom, it really didn’t look like much of anything. It’s a moon jellyfish in the guidebook.IMG_9309


Collector Urchin

IMG_9102These urchins show up here and there. Unlike the spiny ones, this one doesn’t look dangerous. No matter. Don’t touch anything. It’s a rule. Every time I brush something by mistake I pay later. I now wear a wetsuit just to keep the coral from giving me skin rash. I was late to start wearing one. But I swear by it now. Compared to other things on the reef this urchin is not a common find. And it hides during the day. So this urchin also can move about. There no eyes. So this appears an easy photography target if you find one.


Moray Eel

IMG_9092Moray eels usually stay within the coral just showing their head. But on night dives they come out and sometimes swim in the open ocean. Since you are watching for movement they are easy enough to spot. But then the trick is to catch up and get a shot. This guy was slithering along the bottom and wished we were not spotlighting him. He was soon gone. I’d have liked a better image. Someday I’ll get one.

 


Green Eyed Dancing Shrimp

IMG_9075These guys are tiny. The trick to finding them is to poke around under the coral and shine your light until you see a reflection. It’s the eyes reflecting back the light. Then as you approach, they tend to disappear. So you have to siddle up and hope it doesn’t duck. Did I tell you this is a hard shot?


Look What I Caught

IMG_9056I’ve seen this trick but never pulled it off myself. And please don’t tell the kids I was annoying the wildlife. Puffer fish get a bright flashlight beam in their face and they don’t move. So I grabbed it. It puffs. It’s not air. I was wondering. No, it’s water. The feel is like sandpaper. He was not hurt. We got some pictures. Night diving is a challenge to get exposure. The fish looked better then I did. Hey! It was my camera. But I didn’t take my own picture.IMG_9065


Catfish Eel

IMG_8986Spooky. There is a type of diving, which I love. It’s night diving. Fish come out at night when they think danger is less than during the day. These fish were swarming on the bottom. They weren’t headed anywhere. They turned toward the flashlight. So I got a head on view. I can say it was spooky to see them just going nowhere. What were they doing? You never see them during the day. So where do so many fish hide? I have questions. Meanwhile it’s a strange encounter. And if you’re afraid of the dark…


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