Word and Image

Tennis

_DSC4888It was pretty cool! Justin Henin, Belgium, Svetlana Kuznetsova, US Open Tennis 2007 finals… Manny Milan, a well-known Sports Illustrated photographer, invited me as his assistant. I got to access the venue from as close as you can get. It was exciting! And it was an education in shooting sports. Manny told me the shots that the photographers were trying to capture. Then I had the opportunity to get them myself. Lighting is artificial because the finals are in the evening. Most photographers prefer daylight. Everyone tries to capture the moment when the champion collapses in joy on the court.

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The preferred action shot always has the tennis ball and a look of total concentration. Where you’re stationed in the stadium determines whether you are trying wide angle or telephoto images. The cameras are fast and the lenses fast and heavy. The preference is overwhelmingly Canon. The “glass” ranges to the biggest fastest lenses, which are more than a handful. You don’t carry them as much as you “lug” them. Thanks Manny.

In thousands of images there is only a small fraction, which get the player, the expression, and the ball in the same frame. And after all of that, the editors take only a few to illustrate the story of the event.

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Even the award ceremony is scripted. Photographers are assigned positions from which to shoot the champions. It helps if you have connections.

2 responses

  1. Sid Dunnebacke

    Whoo, what I wouldn’t give to have your connections and attend the US Open!

    April 2, 2014 at 8:24 pm

  2. Six degrees of separation… my wife worked with someone who was married to Manny, who saw my extensive and well organized slide collection, and the rest was history.

    April 4, 2014 at 8:23 am

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