Word and Image

Archive for October, 2014

Spanish Dancer

IMG_1276Okay it’s Halloween in NYC and I am not there. I wish. But rather than pull an old image from my archives, I will regale you with another tale. In a round about way there is a costume somewhere?

In all the night dives over the past three seasons, I had yet to encounter a Spanish dancer. It is a mollusk. I have seen a picture on a poster at the dive center. But it was a goal of mine to finally see and photograph one myself. So on this night which started so slowly, Farid suddenly began swinging his light wildly to make me stop and join him. I have to admit he finds some of the best wildlife.IMG_1274

I had to check my book later. But, yes, it’s a Spanish dancer! And yes we played with it. Lifting it above the sea floor it flapped and wiggled down to the sand again. I guess that’s why they call it a dancer. Or otherwise it is the skirtlike edge which reminds you of a Spanish dancer’s skirt. Either way this was pretty thrilling.IMG_1280

What I learned is that you never give up on a dive. Something turns up to make it special. And with all my familiarity with the reef, there is always something I haven’t seen.


Jump

_DSC8428Among many memorable shots taken with my new camera, this is a standout. And I didn’t shoot the image.

This is a shot I have staged before. The kids taught it to me. Julia did it first in Africa and then lately David did it at Waba Crater in Saudi. David’s refinement is to make it look as though you have nothing beneath you but a sheer drop. I admit I am lazy and don’t want to do much post processing. And then there is the photographer. My travel buddy is not fond of heights. So Colleen was not a candidate to jump. She was nervous (eyes closed, hands shaking) about me close to the edge. But someone had to jump and someone had to press the shutter. The other thing I learned from the kids is to bend your knees. Then, even an old man looks like he can jump.


Octopus

IMG_1397Yes. Don’t play with the wildlife. Sorry, we did. Farid and I saw this guy simultaneously. Never give a boy a stick. And right away we were busy prying it from its hiding place. IMG_1384

The octopus tried camouflage, then it ran, and finally a squirt of ink. I had been surprised by ink before so I was prepared to keep an eye on the octopus’s movement. No we weren’t there to eat it. So after I got my shots we retreated and the octopus swam away free of our encounter.IMG_1378It’s hard to ever see an octopus in the open. I have seen just parts of their bodies. Then, recently, I had the luck to see them frequently and even during a night dive. There are enough in the ocean to fill seafood stores and restaurant menus. I still find an octopus encounter a rare event when diving. And now I am getting some shots with tentacles. Great!


Changes

_DSC0432I’m not a great one to embrace change. Then again things change around me constantly. Our primary residence was sold recently. I have no known address nor a hardline phone. Well it’s not that extreme…. Following up on yesterday’s post, I wrote about my Nikon D200 camera. It was new at the time of yesterday’s image. And now I have upgraded to the Nikon D610. Images are posted here. Drat! A week later Nikon announced the D750. Last time around Nikon announced the D300 about a week after I got the D200. I mean, come on!! They just released the D610 didn’t they?. And I got a spiffy fast lens in the FX 24-70mm zoom. The first events were the Indian Powwow in Southampton and the West Indian Day Parade in Brooklyn. _DSC1785I wish I could say there was a standout image right away. But no, there were many images, too many to really say there is one quintessential image. Nowadays I use several cameras, all for different reasons. Point and shoot Canon G12 and S100 as well as iPhone images are mixed in. What I can say is that I shot eleven thousand images in the first month with the Nikon D610. New lens, new camera, I have been getting very nice shots and have certainly using the new equipment.


Life’s Journey

_DSC0020

I recall this photograph. It’s a life lesson. The circumstance – on my way to see the puffins in God only know where, Maine. I had just purchased a brand new spiffy Nikon D200. It was the first event. I had to go from Lewiston to Cutler to pick up the ferry to the puffin island. I calculated a start out time of 3AM to get to the ferry by 6:30AM. It meant zipping up to Bangor on I-95. You can drive fast at that hour. Right off the exit ramp in Bangor I was stopped for speeding. Out of the complete darkness, the flashing patrol car lights caught me. When I told the fireplug short female state trooper I was headed to see the puffins, she ran my plates and then let me go with a warning. A nutcase from NY going to see birds shouldn’t receive a penalty if he’s already nuts. I have now driven to try to see the puffins three times. This time and the next were a complete bust. I saw better pictures in the travel brochure than I got with my new camera. We never got close enough but to see a dot on the water or in the sky.

After Bangor the road is smaller and winds eastward toward the coast. I was tooling along at as fast a pace as the deserted road would allow. Meanwhile I was hyper-attentive in anticipation of the birding. At the early glow of dawn I looked out over a fog covered valley as the sun was beginning to rise. Sunrise is rarely a time I am awake unless I am in an OR with an emergency.

I was running late. But I had to stop for this shot. The digital camera compensated for an impossible lighting scene. This was the shot of my day! It happened before my day ever began and I never knew it till much later. In fact it was a shot of significance. Thinking back and looking over many images I have taken before and since, I can make an observation.

Life happens quickly. I’m not the first to comment on this fact. But sometimes a special moment happens and you don’t know it. Later when you have time to pause and rewind the video – I play back some of the events of my life and finally realize how special this moment was. I knew this was a special shot right from the moment I pressed the shutter. But I was rushing to another event I thought was more important. It turned out that the moment of import was before me as the dawn rose over the fog in the valley. Well I was fortunate to preserve the moment to look back upon. My only regret is that I did not stop to realize it had been one of life’s special moments of which we experience so few in our lifetimes. It is not the first time I have done this nor will it be the last. But if I ever recognize such a moment again I hope I will sit back to savor it.


Orange

_DSC4369 copyOrange is my autumn color. Okay red is pretty good. And yellow is also. But orange, that deep even pattern is not so easy to just dial up. Many a tree view is obscured by some man made object. So often you crop out the extraneous to get to the best shot. Like many things when you have done all the things on your checklist the image pretty much takes itself.


Damarascotta

_DSC4000 copy

The Draper wedding was nearby to this town. Something I read about was pumpkin boat races. What? Well the first year… what do you do with prize winning 500 lb pumpkins. Some folks painted them. Someone got the idea to carve them out and make boats and then race. The first year everyone was in the water. No one had a clue how to make an irregular unbalanced shape race let alone float. So the splashing in cold water images were what I was after. No such luck. By now everyone had a year at the drawing board and no one sank. The event drew a nice crowd and a photo op from Susan Collins, US Senator. Goofy way to re-purpose a 500 lb pumpkin.

_DSC4010 copy


Moray Eel

IMG_0975 aI’ve been down about 150 times now since starting a database and keeping track. I have seen what there is except that always there is a twist or variation. The photo expert I dove with told me he doesn’t like eels. Well I do like them enough to take advantage of an opportunity. I was over the reef and in a crevice there was a moray stretched out. What was unusual was that he was not inside a hole in the coral but fully exposed. He was quite large. I got my shots and even had a chance to get a nice movie. Every time down you see a variation on what you might have seen before and each time it’s a chance to do it different. So I try.


Another Day Another Reflection

_DSC3199 copyOnce again taking the time to walk around has its benefits. The reflection in the pool makes the image special. It doesn’t matter that I have been here before. The scene is always a little different.


Pair

IMG_0841This pair of fish moved in tandem. Brother sister, mating pair, I don’t know. We were at the decompression stop when I should be putting my gear away. But here was one more photo-op.IMG_0846


Lobster Shack

_DSC3040 copyWhenever I was in the area, this shack was a photo op. It is set up perfectly. And I’m sure everyone who passed has this image in their collection. Jules loved it. It is framed somewhere. While there are many versions this one is mine.


Black and White Nudibranch

IMG_0799This one is fairly common on the reef. It is not easy to see but you do run across them. The key again is to try to see the horns. If you don’t play with the wildlife then the scene and the background are determined by your subject.


Runaround Pond

_DSC2902 copyMaybe I’ll be old one day sitting in the fall sun at the side of a pond. I don’t see it somehow. I think that I shall be ever active and full of vinegar. Can’t sit. Too many photo ops, so little time.


Trunkfish

IMG_0736No matter how you approach you are a big air bubble blowing thing swimming about. I’ve taken to not blowing too many bubbles. I avoid making too much sound. If you can pull this off, you get a head on shot without having to capture the fish. I’ve done that too if you saw me in a posts sometime ago. In this case I did not annoy the wildlife.IMG_0738


Duck

_DSC2860 copyI had ample opportunity to explore fall foliage in Maine. Photo ops were everywhere. I don’t recall any other years so productive. It was magical. All manner of images would be in front of my lens. Reflections, ripples, and an impressionist background: what is more priceless?


Nudibranch

IMG_0717Common on the reef I dive, this colorful creature is always a good subject. It doesn’t move fast. The key to the image is the horns and rear tuft. The colorful coral formation was a plus. It takes a bit to set up the technical details of the exposure.


Moose

_DSC2590 copyI had only one actual moose encounter in three years. It got to be a joke where people would tell me where to go to find moose. But it was always a bust. Finally driving randomly through the park in rural Maine, I stopped where a couple cars were along the roadside. There were four moose, two males, a mama, and a baby. They are large enough to be nonplussed about human contact. Since they weren’t moving too quickly I had ample opportunity to get the shots I wanted. The shot I missed was the one I think about. There were four photographers. Two of us had some experience. The wife of the other photographer couldn’t set up her camera. I was helping her. What was her husband doing? The last guy was strictly amateur and walking downhill on a big male moose with a point and shoot in hand. His big grin was scary. He surely had no back up plan in case the moose decided to charge uphill. That was my shot! Well I have it in mind. It was definitely an encounter that made all the searching worthwhile.

 


Blenny

IMG_0709Really! You need a sharp eye. This guy is not easy to see. Another photographer pointed it out. The fish does not shy away. The trick is to get an image. Zooming the lens has disadvantages too.IMG_0709 a


Impressionist

_DSC2140 copyYou see things. The trick is to focus the viewer’s attention on the essentials of the scene in front of me. I am not an artist nor painter. I guess I draw better than I realize. Photography is a much better way for me to express and share what I see. There were lots of possibilities in this scene. I chose the reflection.


Trunkfish

IMG_0698This is described as a solitary fish on the reef. It is shy and hides as soon as you see it. Anytime I can get a shot … what’s hard to show is the mottled spots on its side. I would surprise one and then the chase. Patience is important. And then there is a little bit of luck involved. I love the two toned finish and the angles. Fish are supposed to soft and curved. This guy is built like a brick and colored to attract attention. IMG_0699


Wild Turkey

_DSC1704 copyIt’s not too hard to see wild turkey. It’s a bit of a trick to get a picture. I suppose there is a hunting season too. My best memory was when the kids visited on Thanksgiving. I cooked a turkey dinner – complete with trimmings. And then as we started to sit several wild turkeys crossed lawn right outside the window. We all saw them go by. That was a moment to remember. No, these guys were not those guys. I was too surprised to pull the camera. Besides I was serving up dinner.


Cleaning Station

IMG_0683Wrasses are fish car washes. They hang about and clean fish going by. So it was interesting to see this one head into the gills of a passing goatfish.IMG_0739

Some days it is quite popular to get cleaned up.

IMG_0817It was intriguing to watch. The fish would pause long enough for the wrasse to work.

IMG_0827And then there might be a pause when the next fish arrived. Some fish are not so docile. I’ve seen the wrasse startle fish too.


Crooked Fence

_DSC1701 copySlapped together and painted white, it was certainly a rustic fence. Why paint it at all? Or why not take time to build a proper fence? Who knows? It is the promise of the view around the corner that keeps me going.


Nudibranch

IMG_0677This particular one is not common on the reef where I dive. Yellow black and white, it should be pretty distinctive too. But no it’s not easy to spot. It is tiny. So it’s easy to miss it. One of the senior divers spotted it. It is courtesy to point out subjects. Then it is on me to get an image. I did.IMG_0677 a