Word and Image

Posts tagged “Fish

Follow up


It took two days to go from not too much to see, to eyes and mouth. We actually returned to the same spot. This is a neat trick – to return. It’s not easy. Everything looks similar. In the forest one tree looks about the same as any other. Here’s how I figured it out. I used my dive computer. I saw we were at 50 feet and about twenty minutes in the dive. So, we retraced our path. It worked! Tomorrow the eggs will be hatched. We know this from the last find. Once hatched, the tiny fish will be chaos and I would never get an image. And, we weren’t waiting to see the hatching. Too bad.

I imagine being there to image the hatching. It would indeed be a rare and special thing to witness. That would be for someone way more OCD than I can admit to being. But… No! It’s not my day job and I don’t have the time. But at least for the next diver, it’s about two days to eyes, and one more to hatching.


Damsel fish lay eggs and the guard them. This one moved in and brushed against me as I swam by. I knew it was guarding something. Eggs! It was too early. Nothing had developed yet. The eggs are tiny. You need very high magnification. How high? Enough that I can’t see the eggs by myself. I wear glasses now. There are no corrective lens in my mask. So I shoot and then wait to see what’s on my computer. I am fascinated that I can technically get images like this. And even more special is that finding this is so rare!

Dumb Move Buddy


I never said I wouldn’t post another fish. I just said, “last dive.” This is one weird shy fish. Weird or shy? Both. Picasso trigger fish, the coloration inspired its name. It swims on the reef and usually is speeding away from my camera. So, I was just a second late to shoot a feather duster worm. And this fish flashes past my vision and burrowed into the coral crevice. What the…? I never knew the stripes on the back were raised. And I bet you did not either. I poked him. …sorry! And he burrowed farther. He did not bolt! In this case he would have had to back out. Do fish have a gear for reverse?



Today (a few weeks back) was my last dive for a while. So there will be no more wondrous finds for a bit. I have quite the treasury of images by now. And yet, there seems to always be that one elusive image…. This is a popcorn shrimp. It was nestled in the middle of an anemone. It was there for an instant. Amr got these shots with my camera. I’d have had a go. But it was gone. I’d have never seen it myself. Are you seeing this? After he focused and pointed it out, it was still a challenge to see. It blends in. It does not want to be eaten. It doesn’t care that all I want is a picture. Just hold still for a second. Please!


Is it my image? If you shoot it but did not find it, is it yours? Is the challenge the hunt or the shot? Technically it came from my camera. But no, the shot is not mine. I credit my dive buddy and give thanks. We found it together. He was gracious on my last dive. A good friend. Thanks.

Closeup Please


Cave cleaner shrimp, my first! How? I never knew! But there we were. I was beckoned. I would never see this. So instead, Amr took my camera, shot the image, and pointed to my screen. Ah! It was shadowed and tiny. There’s no way I’d ever have noticed it. Once found, it was a matter of technical prowess. And I was given an opportunity to practice. With enough tries, eventually you can get a reasonable “wow” shot. So, I did.

img_6101The darn thing is transparent! My buddies were busy with another subject. I got plenty of time with this shrimp. He did not move away. He turned left. He turned right. And he stayed put! Shot after shot, my camera, the focus, the light – it all came together. Nailed it! Success! Seeing the picture you take it for granted. And when I look back, I will nod and say mission accomplished. But the thrill of getting such a nice shot! Savor the moment. Yes! I did this. Me! I can do this stuff too!

Challenged – Tiny!




I love a challenge. I like to go to the edge technically and have to struggle to get the image. You would think that point and shoot. Anyone can press the shutter and get whatever. You do it with your iPhone all the time. Right place right time, it’s mostly about being in position. Having a phone makes it easy to catch breaking news. But what if you actually had to work to get the image. It’s not as simple to press the shutter. I had about thirty tries. And, I was inadequate to the task.


The first image is not my shot. Amr. Suffice to say that my effort was lacking. I had two tries in two dives. I was at the limit of my present skill. I’ll get better, just not today. Remember, the current is pushing, breathing makes you shake, the subject is too small to really see, and no one is patiently letting you just shoot. Hey, we have a limit to air and bottom time! If you can imagine a tiny piece of lint, then this nudibranch was about that size. I could not see the details of it with my bare vision. Any movement and you have a focus problem. And I did. A lot! So it is Amr’s image that shows up my technical learning curve. I can get better. There is always a higher bar. Steadying your hand is easy. Just rest it on the coral. Then try not to let your body sway in the current. It helps if you can hold your breath too. Try to put it all together. There’s the trick!



I was just practicing. This was an unintentional find. I have seen parasites attached to the is fish before. Truthfully, I did not see the parasite back then. It was pointed out to me. This time I was just taking a picture of this tiny tiny fish. Really! And there were not one but two parasites attached. Ok, that’s special in my book. One was bad, but two, it seems that this is very bad luck for this poor fish. And once again, this was a discovery I made while editing. Yes, serendipity.



Ok. Be impressed. Even a blind squirrel gets a nut (sometimes). Yes! My dive buddy saw the eggs. She did not have a lens to photograph them. The other two of us did. We shot. I was singularly unimpressed. The eggs had been laid on a white PVC pipe. The guardian parents was buzzing us. The current was moving me about and the visibility was near zero. It was murky! I closed my eyes, adjusted my settings, and pointed and shot. I could not get a high high mage shot. But the image magnified shows eggs and eyes. At least that is my story. And, I’m sticking with it. This made my day.



Look how menacing he appears. I’ve lots of shots of this guy (or his brothers). But this one was horror movie scary. The teeth! My! “The better to eat you with grandma.” I’d would have to say that you see this guy and you move in for a shot. He’s fair game because he will sit still long enough for me to set up. Move in a little closer. It’s not a snapshot. Ah! Perfect! Thanks for posing. Yes, he looks like a prehistoric monster of the deep. In real life he is shy and swims away from me if I am too close.

Bite me! – It bit me!


I was attacked. I’ve shown you an encounter in a previous post. I was roughly in the same area photographing a couple subjects. This guy (I’m not sure he’s the same as the other) started attacking my close up lens. Ok! Get a picture. I did. Then he came back again and again. He attacked my goggles.


Finally, he took a nip of me. (yes, look close, he left a red mark). Ouch! I did not notice any source for the attack. There were no eggs or juvenile fish around. I was surprised and promptly beat off his attack with my dive stick. Yes a sword fight under the sea. Jules wrote to tell me that they are territorial. All this time, I have seen this species often and no one ever attacked me. Yes, I was sure surprised!