Word and Image

Posts tagged “Flowers

Superbloom again

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It’s been a good spring. We caught another superbloom. This time it was a field of yellow. It was not advertised so the only one to be there with me was Colleen and the veterinary tech at the vet office. The twins were in for shots.

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Ray has been shaking his head. “Can you check his ears?” The vet took a swab. No ear mites. But there is bacteria and yeast. Treatment? Ok. I don’t know what it cost – plausible deniability. I was a surgeon. We wore gloves for surgery. There is bacteria on your skin. That would be a fact. And mold forms on food left in the fridge too long. So let me ask. Do you think there might be bacteria and yeast in a cat’s ear? I feel like a pediatrician who appeases the parent by prescribing an antibiotic for a viral cold. Not me. It was Colleen who asked the question.

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Bugs

I’m working a container garden on a deck about 20 up. We have a planter with green onions/chives that bloom in the spring. How’d I get these bugs? They flew on up? Or crawled? It’s a long way. How’d they find them? It was about the last thing I expected when I edited the images. I was looking for stamens and other flower parts. Bugs! We got bugs.

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…at least three.


Closeup

It’s spring. I just completed the annual planting ritual. This year I avoided (mostly) Home Depot and Lowes. Their plants are less costly? But the quality is inferior. I got much nicer stuff and for comparable price at the local nurseries. Well, they were a bit of a hike. We traveled greater than 20 miles to get there. Different stores carry different things. I won’t belabor. I got carnations at Walmart. They were spectacular last year. As always, after planting, a series of flower shots follow. This year I report that the pics taken with the Sony RX100M6 are inferior to the Canon G7X. The Canon just has better close focus capability. I can get a good shot with the Sony but it is much harder to get close focus on the flower parts. Realizing this fact I utilized the strength of the Canon at close range. As a result my results were way better and much easier to achieve.


Delaware superbloom

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Can you believe? Yup, we got home and driving along the road…our very own Delaware superbloom. It’s clover. Red! I admit that I have never seen red clover blooming. We saw patches along the road… till we came upon this field. No one else was there to appreciate it. There were no other cars stopped. There were no tourists wandering around and trampling the blooms. Nature put on a spectacular show and no one was there to see it. … maybe they are coming later.

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Superbloom

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Did I tell you? Poppies! The news from California has been about the superbloom – again. We saw it once before. It’s rare. It’s special. We’ve been fortunate to see it twice. It comes about because of the rains that stimulate growth and flowers. Ordinarily it is dry and no bloom is more the norm. We saw it! To be sure, we took advantage with Noa. Great! She’s already seen one and not even a year old. No matter. I will always be impressed by nature’s power.

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The sheer size and scope of the bloom is indescribable. Miles! It went for miles.

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Add baby… she was there. She won’t remember it specifically. I asked Jules about Disney once. She replied, “I’ve seen the slides and video. I was there. But it is the video and images that are what I can recall.”

Oh well, we were all there on a glorious spring day. Nature! It’s pretty grand when it makes up its mind to put on a show.


Timing

We arrived at 8:30am to see the blossoms. By noon the crowds were considerably more. In the early morning you are not alone but there is enough space to make it appear as though you have the trees to yourself. Later that task is much more challenging. I’m not an early morning person. I’m more a random come as you are and find what you see type. But here I was in the same place twice. We circled back to get to our parked car. Consider it time delay photo ops.


Orchid pick

Too numerous to pick. I was taking shot after shot. Mostly good. Pick one, or two… shots. I was not doing catalog work. I was looking for an image to stand out. Ah! Well, here’s my pick. As I say, too many images, not enough space. I don’t discard. But there is only so much time (too little) to acknowledge one’s work. Don’t spend too much time. I don’t obsess. I let gestalt prevail. View the lot and let one image catch your eye. It’s no beauty contest. No one will hate you if you do it.

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Orchids

In the National Portrait Gallery there is an atrium. And this was the venue for a large orchid display. Beautiful! Enjoy! And there were people to see it too. I missed the shot of a short white polka dotted dress on a tall young man with sideburns. Drat! But I got this one of a guy mimicking one of the flowers. Thank you for being there for me.


Weeping cherry

The Japanese cherry blossoms are not the only blossoms vying for attention in late March April. The problem in photographing is to get a quintessential image. I failed. But I got a representative image that is more indicative and offsets the glory of Washington’s blossoms. Weeping cherries were easy to find and spot walking DC. They just did not seem to draw the crowds.


Forsythia

It’s hard to love and photograph forsythia. They are brief but brilliant blooms in early spring. The individual flowers are not particularly photogenic compared to the whole bush. The rest of the year the bush is ignored. Forsythia tend to be planted in locations suitable to be ignored the rest of the year. Hence, they seem to have a secondary place of charm in spring.