Word and Image

Posts tagged “Forsythia

Isolation

Me? I photograph. Even if I am sheltering in place, I’m still photographing. There was an article on not sharing your camera – germs. Ha! The cats? No one else would use my stuff. It’s like toothbrushes. Not really, but, it’s akin to my sitting down to loom (weave) on Colleen’s devices. Once upon a time I said that about spinning…. Rainy days bring out color saturation. Out of the box the image of forsythia can easily be enhanced. I chose to show you what the camera gave me. There are lots of cat portraits. I shoot the cats because they are available, though not necessarily willing. And, when you get it (a good shot) you know it. There are just so many good ones and so few posts.

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Spring

In the midst of crisis we took the opportunity to social distance on our bikes. Folks were out and about tending to their own business. We took in the neighborhood and the flowers. Home, we took advantage of our imported Scotch (yes, all the way from Scotland). Ok, I don’t drink (alcohol) so we made our version of Bailey’s, mixing “good” Scotch with egg nog. Yes, Xmas egg nog preserved and unopened… til now. I spent the rest of the afternoon in an alcohol induced coma.


Forsythia

Beautiful! You need full sun and a full bush. Other than that, there’s nothing particularly spectacular about the picture. Once a year, bright brilliant blossoms bloom briefly. The rest of the year it’s a non-descript bush of little note. One note, once a year.


Forsythia

It’s hard to love and photograph forsythia. They are brief but brilliant blooms in early spring. The individual flowers are not particularly photogenic compared to the whole bush. The rest of the year the bush is ignored. Forsythia tend to be planted in locations suitable to be ignored the rest of the year. Hence, they seem to have a secondary place of charm in spring.


Peak Moment

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On the road… again. It was the peak of the forsythia bloom. Up close they aren’t much. But the whole bush does seem to pretty stunning as you pass. I keep looking for a quintessential shot. It’s a quest. The key is to get the right composition. Once again, I admit I shot on the fly. I did not stop. There are only so many times you can stop before your companion complains. She indulges me plenty. I try not to take advantage of her good nature. I will live longer that way.


Brilliant or Muted

Putting it all together, daffodils and forsythia are spring. I like the bright brilliance of the yellow flowers in direct sun. I enjoy the muted colors of an overcast day. It’s glass half empty or half full. It’s the same level in the glass. You choose.


Details

Forsythia, they bloom for a short time in the spring. Bright, brilliant, showy, and then gone. I don’t like them because the bloom is so relatively brief. And daffodils, the same. I’m not a bulb guy. I like to look, but I’ve never cultivated them. Water droplets are a plus. This detail of a forsythia bloom is less usual than the whole bush. I don’t mind visiting these flowers in someone else’s yard.


Dandelion

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To be honest I’m not sure I’ve ever noticed a dandelion up close. Current observation stems from my fish days. I was doing macro photography at the end. Details! It’s what I began to notice. For instance, I never quite noticed the stamens in amongst the petals. Imagine that? It makes sense. That is the raison d’etre for the flower. And? How come they are weeds when all the other spring flowers are welcomed as they cover my visual landscape? Unbidden, they clutter my vision wherever weeds would grow? And it’s entirely too easy to grow them. You don’t try.


Forsythia

_DSC2488It’s spring in southern Maine. Forsythia are a classic harbinger of early spring. Bright yellow bushes flower. The rest of the year the bushes are completely nondescript. The flowers lack memorable detail. It is the essential splash of color, which catches the eye. So it is a prop against the other elements. An old fence looks a lot better with a forsythia in bloom.


Forsythia

1962 02 Forsythia Westhampton copy

This plant is really ugly most of the year. It’s gangly and unkempt. But, for a brief period in the spring, this bush really shines. So the trick is to get a shot that does it justice. The flower itself is not particularly photogenic. It’s really about the color. You don’t want to get too close. There are too many imperfections. The plant needs a pairing, hence the white picket fence. I’ve taken a lot of forsythia shots over the years. I’m still waiting for a better shot. But this will do, to illustrate my struggle.